1989 BowmanJohn Kruk#460
John Kruk moved in with an old high school friend, Roy Plummer, who turned out to be a bank robber.

Soon Kruk was hearing stories from Keyser about Plummer skipping town, owing people money, and robbing a local grocery store.
"I said, ‘Man I’m out here almost every day. I don’t see it.’ There were rumors of them selling drugs out of the house, having wild parties," Kruk said. "I didn’t see it. The house was immaculate. You’d think if a drug addict lived there, there would be evidence."
By November, Kruk decided to play winter ball in Mexico and moved out.
"We were going out a lot, drinking, having a good time," Kruk said. "And I thought, ‘You know what? I’ve got to do something. I have yet to prepare for the following season.’"
In February 1988 he went to spring training.
"I kept hearing more from spring training. When I got back for the season, I don’t know what excuse I made to him, but I said I needed to find my own place," Kruk said. "Then, of course, the FBI comes in right before batting practice and it’s ‘Holy crap.’"
The FBI questioned Kruk and showed him a picture of Plummer robbing a bank wearing a hat that read, “American by Birth. West Virginian by the Grace of God.”
The FBI told Kruk that Plummer believed he was the one that turned him in.
"What I’m hearing from the FBI and other people is that he’s a drug-possessed, gun-toting psychopath now. Everyone is telling me, ‘He’s coming after you,’" Kruk said. "Every knock on the door could be a teammate or it could be him. It scared the shit out of you."
Kruk admits the stress affected his play during the 1988 baseball season.
"Oh-for-four meant absolutely nothing to me at that time," Kruk said. "The only thing I wanted was to get the season over with." [The Charleston Gazette, 2008]

Kruk had a miserable season, hitting .241, but he still walked 80 times for a .369 OBP, so he managed to be productive anyway. He started off miserably with San Diego in ‘89, hitting .184 in 31 games, before he was traded to the Phillies, where he hit .331 the rest of the way. Outside of the ‘88 season, Kruk never hit under .291.

1989 Bowman
John Kruk
#460

John Kruk moved in with an old high school friend, Roy Plummer, who turned out to be a bank robber.

Soon Kruk was hearing stories from Keyser about Plummer skipping town, owing people money, and robbing a local grocery store.

"I said, ‘Man I’m out here almost every day. I don’t see it.’ There were rumors of them selling drugs out of the house, having wild parties," Kruk said. "I didn’t see it. The house was immaculate. You’d think if a drug addict lived there, there would be evidence."

By November, Kruk decided to play winter ball in Mexico and moved out.

"We were going out a lot, drinking, having a good time," Kruk said. "And I thought, ‘You know what? I’ve got to do something. I have yet to prepare for the following season.’"

In February 1988 he went to spring training.

"I kept hearing more from spring training. When I got back for the season, I don’t know what excuse I made to him, but I said I needed to find my own place," Kruk said. "Then, of course, the FBI comes in right before batting practice and it’s ‘Holy crap.’"

The FBI questioned Kruk and showed him a picture of Plummer robbing a bank wearing a hat that read, “American by Birth. West Virginian by the Grace of God.”

The FBI told Kruk that Plummer believed he was the one that turned him in.

"What I’m hearing from the FBI and other people is that he’s a drug-possessed, gun-toting psychopath now. Everyone is telling me, ‘He’s coming after you,’" Kruk said. "Every knock on the door could be a teammate or it could be him. It scared the shit out of you."

Kruk admits the stress affected his play during the 1988 baseball season.

"Oh-for-four meant absolutely nothing to me at that time," Kruk said. "The only thing I wanted was to get the season over with." [The Charleston Gazette, 2008]

Kruk had a miserable season, hitting .241, but he still walked 80 times for a .369 OBP, so he managed to be productive anyway. He started off miserably with San Diego in ‘89, hitting .184 in 31 games, before he was traded to the Phillies, where he hit .331 the rest of the way. Outside of the ‘88 season, Kruk never hit under .291.